NEWS

Bickel Camp Needs You!

Since 2006 Friends of Jawbone has actively supported the caretakers, and the non-profit organization Friends of Last Chance Canyon, in their efforts to preserve Bickel Camp, including donating a quad to the camp which was recently used to help clear the area of trash. So many of these historic, depression-era mining camps have been looted over the years that it feels important to help provide a way to protect Bickel Camp from suffering the same fate as the Burro Schmidt camp.

If you have long loved visiting Bickel Camp and often wondered what it would be like to live and work in that scenic and isolated area then we have a special opportunity for you. Caretakers are needed at Bickel Camp and you can help!

Read more: Bickel Camp Needs You!

Jawbone Canyon Plays Host to the Desert Advisory Council

About forty members of the public, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) representatives, and Desert Advisory Council (DAC) members met early on Friday morning, the 20th of April, to take a tour of the El Paso Mountains and Jawbone Canyon. The Desert Advisory Council advises the BLM on the management of the nearly 11 million acres which comprise the California Desert District. To be sure that they have an accurate knowledge of the areas on which they are advising the DAC periodically takes tours of various areas of interest, in this case with the BLM leading the tour in conjunction with Friends of Jawbone. For DAC Members it was a chance to see the backroads of the El Paso Mountains and Jawbone Canyon regions. For the public it was a unique opportunity to see the DAC and BLM in action and witness first hand the areas being affected by the WEMO act and various conservation projects.

Read more: Jawbone Canyon Plays Host to the Desert Advisory Council

FOJ Randsburg Site Gets Two New Interpretive Panels

On March 21 a group of nine Friends of Jawbone volunteers, organized by longtime volunteer George Baland, installed two new desert tortoise information panels in the OHV parking area in Randsburg. It took about two hours of digging and hard work under the already-hot California sun to get the holes positioned and dug deep enough to secure the displays. The new panels give information on tortoise habitat and habits and are now located in front of the FOJ OHV information kiosk.

Read more: FOJ Randsburg Site Gets Two New Interpretive Panels